Month: January 2016

Analysing Images

Black Power 1968 –

The first thing my eye was drawn to in this picture was the large image. Then, I saw Gary Younge, this is called secondary.

Last week, we began doing rollovers, looked at websites relating to our own, target audience/marketing, A-Master, hyperlinks and we used Adobe Muse.

1024 x 720 = standard size for website

1024 x 720 = 786,432 pixels

creation of templates for your homepage to decide the look of the website taking into consideration:

  • Colours
  • Textures
  • Composition
  • Use of imagery
  • design of link and menu buttons
  • density of information

Screen Shot 2016-01-29 at 11.36.39

First we inserted a new layer and used the eye on the right to turn it off and edit it. I used the magic wand tool and quick selection tool by clicking ctrl on the keyboard. Then I dragged a new picture on and changed the order of the layers.

Homepage

Music video

Website Design

Video Installation                           x5

‘About Me’

Personal Project

Blog

  • SELL
  • PLAN
  • REALISE (RECORD)
  • EDIT
  • EVALUATE

I made a logo on Adobe Photoshop.

Video Art Installation Proposal

My video art installation is going to be a sharp pencil laid vertically on white plain paper. Then, I will reflect a source of different colours in lights around the pencil and the camera will pan around it. Then, I will rewind the clips and slow them down.

The duration of the video will be between 10 and 20 seconds. There would be slow and smooth royalty free music for the duration of the video.

Audience

A “niche” audience means a specific, small or particular audience. For example, liking certain things in particular.

A “mass” audience means the opposite.

Primary – Doing one thing at a time (one activity), for example, watching television and that is all you are doing, or reading a book and not doing anything but that, not being preoccupied. {Consumption}

Secondary – Doing more than one thing at a time, for example, listening to music whilst reading. {Consumption}

Tertiary – When you are not paying attention, but you are there, for example, the television is on but you are not watching it.

Preferred – You react the way the writer wants you to react to the programme or film (prefers.)

Oppositional – You reach the opposite way to how the writer wants you to react to the programme or film.

Negotiated – You react a different way based on your own experiences to the programme, for example, if you are watching a sad film and someone in your life has died, you may relate to it.

 

 

Web Design Pre-Production

Audience/User

Demographic

Who is the user?

Is this person male or female? If both, use percentages.

Age (lower and upper age)

Country

My website is aimed at both genders. 40% male and 60% female because I think mostly female’s would listen to music, but some males do too. Mostly aimed at teenagers aged 13 to 20. It is aimed at mostly United Kingdom but also U.S.A.

I know the user is going to be a teenage girl aged 18 who has a huge interest in music. They would probably be bored at about midday and want to listen to music, or they could be in college going onto the website listening to music whilst they are working. They will also be from the United Kingdom.

Lego Star Wars Website

I think this user is male aged about 5 to 14 from England.

http://www.youtube.com

http://www.vevo.com

https://soundcloud.com

What makes my website different is that on my website you can upload videos quickly and you can chat to people from across the world live.

The user would be a 18 year old girl who lives in a town or city, probably in the UK. They would be middle class. They would be able to be sociable on this website by chatting live to people so it is a website like Facebook combined with YouTube. They would be in college going onto the website at about midday whilst working. They would be on a low income but enough to pay for the internet. The website would gain income from adverts. They would possibly just about drive but not be in a fancy car. They wouldn’t have an extremely social lifestyle because they would be addicted to chatting online and to the website. They might also use the website at home to talk to people whilst listening to music on the same tab. They would be living with their parents and older brother with a steady income. They would be like a typical mischievous teenage girl, so they would misbehave and use the website whilst revising but they would also chat to people online instead of working. They will be using this website on a PC, but could browse it on a phone or tablet.

We know this website is the NHS website from the logo, colours, text, layout/design, search, graphics (the cross in the left hand corner), toolbar/menus, rollover.

Search = we are looking for exact match

A-Z = search using first few words e.g. Goth, gothic cathedral

Navigation = relies on active links (testing – when you click a button to go on another page, you need to test it to make sure it is active and the link is there.)

To make the website we changed the height and width…

Then, we went to the home page.Screen Shot 2016-01-22 at 13.48.58

We then went to the A-master at the bottom and clicked it before going to browser fill and changing the background colour. A – master is the main page and background.

Screen Shot 2016-01-22 at 13.53.34

Then insert a new page and rename them.

Screen Shot 2016-01-22 at 13.58.04

Then add a B-Master and add a state button as shown:

Screen Shot 2016-01-22 at 14.52.22

Audience/User Websites

Audience/user

Demographic

Who is the user?

Is this person male or female? If both, use percentages.

Age (lower and upper age)

Country

My website is aimed at both genders. 40% male and 60% female because I think mostly female’s would listen to music, but some males do too. Mostly aimed at teenagers aged 13 to 20. It is aimed at mostly United Kingdom but also U.S.A.

I know the user is going to be a teenage girl aged 15 who has a huge interest in music. They would probably be bored at about midday and want to listen to music, or they could be in college/school going onto the website listening to music whilst they are listening. They will also be from the United Kingdom.

Lego Star Wars Website

I think this user is male aged about 5 to 14 from England.

http://www.youtube.com

http://www.vevo.com

https://soundcloud.com

What makes my website different is that on my website you can upload videos quickly and you can chat to people from across the world live.

News

National news is news from this country.

International (or global) news is news from around the world.

Local/regional news is local news so the reporter may say, “News where you are.”

Current affairs programmes aren’t quite the same.

News and current affair programmes are studio-based programmes. Generally presented by one or two news casters, sitting or standing at a desk. They contain pre-recorded stories (VT), live interviews in a studio or on screen and live/recorded transmission from reporters on location. News production is fast-paced and highly pressurised. Producers need to respond quickly to changing events.

Newsreaders need to dress a certain way. Suits and ties/dresses are signified. They mean all kinds of things like success, smart and rich. They must have received pronunciation. This means they get taught to speak a certain way when on screen. No accent is allowed to be heard on the news.

News ‘story’ suggests it has a narrative structure.

Headline – summary

General Values

  • Negativity
  • Currency
  • Simplicity
  • Personality
  • Closeness to home
  • Recent News
  • Continuity

Agenda Setting

The news organisations set up an agenda of topics which form the news. Once more this opposes the idea that news is somehow a collection of truthful events and facts from ‘out there.’ Editors choose the news.

 

Uses and gratifications model

The audience uses the media to satisfy the needs and wants. It is used to consume views or political views.

Escapism-Avoid thinking about your own problems/doing a chore or avoiding people.

Social uses e.g. conversation with others – “Did you see……. last night?”

Relational uses, for example, sitting watching TV with a friend.

Catharsis Theory

Psychologists argue media violence can act as catharsis for viewers, who watch violent acts and then feel as if their aggressive urges and less likely to happen for example if you do violent sports like boxing.

 

Technological or media determinism

Technology – push = Getting forced to have technology, like in this day and age.

Demand – pull = Wishing we have technology.

The ‘Technological Imperative’

Once you’ve invented something, it is going to be everything to us and you can’t go back to paper for example.

Analogue data is more accurate than digital data.

Digital data devices only read 1’s and 0’s, they can only approximate audio or video signal.

Analogue data devices read everything.

Convergence (or cross-media convergence) is when old and new media collide, where flow of content is across multiple media platforms, co-operation between media industries.

 

Sound & interpreting media texts

Parallel sound – When what we see on the screen fits with the music and what is happening on screen, for example, if there are people chatting on the beach, we expect to see and hear acoustic guitars and people laughing and having fun.

Contrapuntal sound – When what we see on the screen is different to the music. So the scene shows people chatting on the beach but the music is tense.

Ambient sound – The background sound, for example, traffic or wind.

Diegetic sound – Part of the story world. So if you were a character in a film, you could hear it, for example, music coming from a car radio in a car being driven by the character.

Non – diegetic sound = Only audible to the audience, like in a battle film, for example Pirates Of The Caribbean.

diegetic v non diegetic

Diegetic sounds that are louder than they would really be are called amplified sound.

Orchestral stab/sting – a sharp sound to scare or shock someone.

Diegetic sound can occur on and off screen – sometimes sound can act as a ‘sound bridge’ between two scenes. Sound bridge is when the sound from one scene continues although the images on screen has changed onto the next scene. This helps with continuity.

An image can be polysemic (many meanings) to the story.

Relay – Words in same way as the image. They work to tell a story equally.

Mode of address means the way the text ‘speaks’ to you.

 

Unit 2: Introduction to design & research skills in creative media production

Session 1: An introduction to research methodology (how you do things).

Why is research important?

  • Build on what’s gone before or even avoid repeating anything done before.
  • Ensure projects are possible, safe and/or affordable before we start.
  • We can discover, measure or prove things through quantitative or qualitative data gathering.

Costing a TV programme

Mode of address

£1800 for location fee

£47,667 per episode

£850 for camera hire

£850 a day per cameraman/woman

£1900 a day for production team

£500 a day for copyrighted clips

£50 for copyrighted pictures

£5,100 for camera crew & equipment

£1100 for lighting

£700 for sound equipment

£550 for offline editing

£500 for props

£200 for costumes

DV (digital video) is cheaper to run TV programmes than most other types of cameras, however they are tapes so it can be a real hassle to carry around.

If you work for the BBC, you mostly get music for free, but if you don’t, you have to pay.

Actors have to belong to a society called equity which gives them the right to act. But, they must pay £300 a year for this.

Cameramen earn between £500 and £1000 a day. Editors earn about £300.

BECTU – Broadcast Entertainment Cinema Theatre Union. These set the rates for you.