Critical Perspectives & How I Used Them While Making Our Music Video

One example of critical perspectives include gender theory which includes the male gaze, masculinity and feminism. Male gaze is when the camera focuses on certain parts of the body. For example: in the movies James Bond, the camera pans closely to James Bond’s topless body and in music videos such as Anaconda by Nicki Minaj, they focus on the women’s bottoms mostly, which gives the audience no choice but to look there, no matter whether you’re female or male (gender), heterosexual or gay (sexuality).

The audience uses media to satisfy the needs and wants. They do this by showing programmes people like to watch called gratifications. One way they do this is by using escapism which attracts the audience and helps them temporarily forget what’s going on in their lives and helps the audience to put off doing things like house chores.

Another critical perspective would be signs, otherwise known as semiotics and signifiers. These are used in music videos where the person on the screen uses gestures. For example in R&B and rap songs such as most of Eminem songs and Tupac’s ‘I Get Around’. Both Eminem and Tupac use hand gestures whenever they rap to add empathy to the song and to attract the viewer.

Genre is another critical perspective which focuses on stereotypical things such as in music videos that have a horror genre like Thriller by Michael Jackson, they usually wear dark clothes, have little lighting and usually features ghosts, vampires or werewolves or a combination of them all.

In our music video, we aimed the target audience of our music video at teenagers around our age, 16 – 18, to make the music video a little easier to film. We found that when you know the target audience and use critical perspectives when planning and filming your music video, in general it makes the whole thing a lot easier and it’s more useful knowing the target audience beforehand.

 

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